Archive for May, 2008

Lecture by Andrea Robbins and Max Becher at Santa Fe Art Institute, June 2nd

From the e-blast from the Santa Fe Art Institute:

“The primary focus of photographers Andrea Robbins and Max Becher’s work is, by their own definition, the transportation of place – situations in which one limited or isolated place strongly resembles another distant one. Everywhere, not only in the new world, such situations are accumulating and accepted as genuine locales – for example the New York New York and Paris hotels in Las Vegas, NV. Traditional notions of place, in which culture and geographic location neatly coincide, are being challenged by legacies of slavery, colonialism, holocaust, immigration, tourism, and mass-communication.

Robbins & Becher plan to centralize their workshop around of the physical and theoretical problems of working in “new” locations both in terms of settling in (the nuts and bolts of “entering” a place), as well as some of the problems of picturing people (through portraiture, artifacts and architecture) and the balancing of the artists concerns with that of the subjects’.

Robbins & Becher are part of the Santa Fe Art Institute’s 2008 curated lecture season “Outsider: Tourism, Migration and Exile.” They, along with 22 other artists and creative thinkers from around the world, will join us to explore the different movements of people, culture and ideas and what role art can and should play.

For more information contact SFAI at 505 424-5050 or inf@sfai.org.”

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TALKS at LACMA in June: Paul Graham, Philip-Lorca diCorcia, Eikoh Hosoe and more

Three great public panels/presentaitons coming up at LACMA. From the LACMA website

Photography Discussion: The Value of Photographs
Thursday, June 5 | 7:00 pm

In this panel discussion, curator of photography Charlotte Cotton and artists Anthony Pearson, Paul Graham, and Soo Kim consider how the way we look at photographs is changing in light of the approaching obsolescence of analog photographic prints. Focusing on the work of each of the individual artists, the panel explores how this shift affects our understanding of the history of photography and the values that we assign to contemporary photographic prints.
Brown Auditorium | Free; tickets required | Tickets are available at the box office one hour before the program begins.

Conversations with Artists: Philip-Lorca diCorcia
Tuesday, June 10 | 7:00 pm
In conversation with curator of photography Charlotte Cotton, the influential photographer Philip-Lorca diCorcia expands on the nature and meaning of his art. LACMA’s exhibition of diCorcia’s photography, which opens May 25, demonstrates his long-term agendas and presents one thousand of his Polaroid pictures together for the first time.
Bing Theater | Free, no reservations

Conversations with Artists: Hosoe Eikoh
Saturday, June 21 | 2:00 pm
Hosoe Eikoh has devoted much of his career to creating images of butoh dancers, setting a benchmark for the visual arts through his fusion of photography with this avant-garde dance tradition. He and curator of Japanese art Hollis Goodall will discuss his work in the exhibition Hosoe Eikoh and Butoh: Photographing Strange Notions, on view in the Pavilion for Japanese Art June 22 through September 14.
Brown Auditorium | Free; tickets required | Tickets are available at the box office one hour before the program begins

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Cornell Capa Dies; Memorial to be September 10th in NYC

On Friday morning, May 23rd, our photography community lost on of its strongest voices. Cornell Capa was an outstanding photojournalist but will be best known among photographers young and old for his contributions as president of Magnum Photos and founder of the Internation Center for Photography, both pillars of excellence. The number of photographers who have been inspired by all that ICP offers is impossible to count. And, Cornell’s loss comes painfully close to the recent loses of his Magnum colleagues Philip Jones Griffiths and Burt Glinn.

To read the ICP remembrance click here

To see read about Cornell’s life and view the prepared slide show on Magnum’s Blog, click here.

Read the New York Times remembrance written by Philip Gefter here

Read the LA Times obituary here

Read the International Herald Tribune obituary here

To read the PDN Obituary, click here.

Read and listen to the remembrance of NPR’s All Things Considered here

When print dealer Peter Fetterman produced a catalogue of Capa’s work in 2001, it featured this piece written by the late Richard Whelan, biographer of Cornell’s older brother Robert Capa:

“During the course of his life, Cornell Capa has had three major and interrelated careers: (1) as a photographer who worked extensively for Life magazine and who has long been a member of the influential Magnum agency; (2) as the champion and editor of his brother Robert Capa¼s work; and (3) as the founder and director of the International Center of Photography in New York. After the opening of ICP in 1974, Cornell Capa had no time to pursue his own career as a photographer. Furthermore, his modesty and ethics prevented him from using his position to promote the photographs that he had made during nearly thirty years with Life and Magnum. Thus Cornell Capa the photographer has been overshadowed- indeed, almost completely hidden- by Cornell Capa the founder of ICP and by Cornell Capa the brother of Robert. Cornell Capa coined the phrase “concerned photographer” to signify a photographer who is passionately dedicated to doing work that will contribute to the understanding or the well-being of humanity- work that focuses with compassion, with intelligence, with warmth and generosity of spirit upon the human condition. Cornell Capa is himself a deeply concerned photographer. To all his work he brings his love of people and his profound concern for the plight of humanity. Robert Capa never photographed war as a dispassionate observer but rather always as a partisan. He used his camera not merely to make an accurate record but also to help the side in whose cause he believed. Cornell Capa has done the same as a photographer of peace. He has photographed, as a partisan fighting the cause of humanity, what he loves and what he hates. He often quotes the words of reformer-photographer Lewis W. Hine: “There were two things that I wanted to do. I wanted to show the things that needed to be corrected. And I wanted to show the things that needed to be appreciated.” That is precisely what Cornell has dedicated his life to doing. As a teenager, Cornell wanted to become a doctor so that he could help humanity. Instead, he became a humanitarian photographer. It is very revealing that he became deeply involved in photographing the work of missionaries in Central and South America, for he himself is a kind of missionary, dedicated to advancing the cause of human decency through the power of photographic images to changed the ways in which people look at their world. Cornell Capa is above all else a photographer of people. No landscape or citiscape interests him unless it is populated. Robert Capa once remarked that the best advice he could give to other photographers was: “Like people and let them know it.” That phrase could easily serve as the motto for the entire professional career of Cornell Capa. Without any doubt the quality that characterizes and unites all of Cornell¼s work is his extraordinary rapport with the people he photographs. Like his brother, Cornell puts his subjects at ease with his friendship, his sensitivity, his sympathy, and his enthusiasm. Cornell never exploits his subjects to make a sensationalistic picture; to him a good picture is one that does justice to its subject. Similarly with John F. Kennedy, Cornell was an enthusiastic supporter. After having covered Kennedy’s campaign, he was so moved by the new president’s inaugural address that he conceived- and was able to put into immediate execution- a project for nine Magnum photographers to cover every aspect of the administration’s first 100 days. Cornell himself covered the White House, where he was warmly accepted by Kennedy and his wife. (Indeed, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis became an important early supporter of ICP.) In a completely different area of experience, Cornell’s photo-essay about an elderly woman living with her son and daughter-in-law in Philadelphia certainly derived much of its effectiveness from Cornell’s great sympathy with the old lady. His own beloved but demanding mother had lived for many years with him and his wife, Edie, and he was thus well aware of the difficulties on both sides of such a situation. When Camera magazine asked Cornell in 1963 to make a selection of his own photographs for publication, he replied, “Single photographs are not what I do best. My most effective work is groups of photographs which hand together and tell stories. My pictures are the words which make up sentences which in turn form the story… I hope that as often as possible my pictures may have feeling, composition, and sometimes beauty- but my preoccupation is with the story and not with attaining a fine-art level in the individual pictures.” Nevertheless, although Cornell nearly always set out to shoot groups of pictures that would cohere to form a factual and revealing narrative, the fact remains that within most of his photo-essays certain pictures stand out so strongly- because of the feelings that they capture, because of the effectiveness of their composition, and because of the beauty of the impact of the subject as seen and recorded on film by the photographer- that they sum up the entire story and even transcend it. They remain imbued with the very essence of the specific situation or person that they portray, and yet they simultaneously resonate with universal human experience. In other words, they are art. Even in isolation they speak whole sentences, and indeed whole volumes. They stand very solidly on their own and engrave themselves permanently upon the memory. © Richard Whelan, 2001. All rights reserved. From to the book, Cornell Capa, published by The Peter Fetterman Gallery, September 1st, 2001″

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Philip-Lorca diCorcia Exhibition at LACMA through September 14th

From the LACMA website entry for the exhibition:

“Philip-Lorca diCorcia is one of the most influential photographers of all time. This exhibition features works from his key series of the past twenty years including Hustlers, Streetwork, Heads, and Lucky 13. His merging of a high degree of photographic preconception with the happenstance of street casting has become an influential mode of contemporary practice and secured diCorcia’s place in photography’s pantheon. For example, in his series Hustlers (1990–92), diCorcia selected locations along Santa Monica Boulevard, typically at twilight or night. The artist would then cast hustlers on the streets around him as his subjects.

LACMA’s exhibition is the first showing of a powerful installation of 1,000 of the artist’s Polaroid” photographs, titled Thousand. DiCorcia’s most recent series gives an alternative view of the infinite possibilities and practice of photography. Cumulatively, the 1,000 Polaroids offer a vantage point onto this artist’s sensibility and visual preoccupations.

Curated by Charlotte Cotton, this exhibition is organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.”


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World Science Festival 2008 in Manhattan Soon

Check this out – The World Science Festival: a great mix of science, art, creativity coming to Manhattan May 28 – June 1.

One of the many Festival events I would love to see: WSF Street Fair, 10-6 a.m. in the streets around Washington Square Park (the Village).

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REMINDER: ACP Opens Registration TODAY for Fall Portfolio Reviews

a reminder that registration has opened for ACP 10:

Atlanta Celebrates Photography

ACP 10 Portfolio Review

As part of ACP 10, Atlanta Celebrates Photography will offer a day of portfolio reviews with a distinguished group of reviewers on Saturday, October 11th, 2008, at Grady High School in Atlanta. Space is available for fifty-two (52) photographers, and each photographer will receive four reviews. Confirmed photographers will be able to requests reviewers in July, and the final assignments will be done through a computerized matching program. ACP makes every effort to match photographers with their first choice of reviewers.

We will be accepting registrations for the ACP 10 Portfolio Review starting May 26th, 2008. Registrations to this year’s Portfolio Review are juried, and attendees will need to submit 3-5 jpgs with a brief artist’s statement for consideration. Registration will remain open until June 7th, and successful registrants will be notified by June 14th.

Your Images: You will need to submit 3-5 jpgs for consideration. Please make sure each file is less than 1 megabyte and no wider than 900 pixels. Please name your jpgs sequentially, as follows: “lastname_firstname_01.jpg”

Artist’s Statement: You will need to submit a brief artist’s statement of 3-5 sentences about your work. It is acceptable to submit jpgs from multiple projects; your statement can take a general look at your work, in total. Please include titles of your submitted photographs in your artist’s statement, if necessary.

As of Thursday, May 20th, here are our confirmed reviewers:

  • Sue Brisk - Editorial Director, Magnum Photos, NYC, NY
  • Brian Clamp - Owner, Clampart, NYC, NY
  • Daniel Cooney - Owner, Cooney Fine Art, NYC, NY
  • Julian Cox - Head Curator of Photography, High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA
  • Natasha Egan - Assoc. Dir. Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, IL
  • Dana Faconti - Editor & Publisher, Blind Spot, NYC, NY
  • Sylvie Fortin - Editor, Art Papers, Atlanta, GA
  • Debra Klomp - Owner, Klompching Gallery, Brooklyn, NY
  • Carol McCusker - Curator, MOPA, San Diego, CA
  • Danielle Place - Creative Director, Photography Department, Turner Images, Atlanta, GA
  • Erik Schneider - Owner, Quality Pictures, Portland, OR
  • Anna Skillman - Owner, Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta, GA
  • Madeline Yale - Director of Houston Center for Photography, Houston, TX

You may pay for your registration with a major credit card. Your card will not be charged unless you are selected as one of the 52 photographers. On the day of the Portfolio Review, work must be shown to the reviewers as prints, and cannot be reviewed on laptops or other computers.

BEGIN REGISTRATION HERE.

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Cornell Capa, ICP Founder and Magnum Member, Dead at 80

On Friday morning, May 23rd, our photography community lost on of its strongest voices for authenticity and education. Cornell Capa was an outstanding photojournalist but will be best known among photographers young and old for his contributions as president of Magnum Photos and founder of the International Center for Photography, both pillars of excellence. The number of photographers who have been inspired by all that ICP offers is impossible to count. And, Cornell’s loss comes painfully close to the recent losses of his long-time Magnum colleagues Philip Jones Griffiths and Burt Glinn.

To read the ICP remembrance click here

To see read about Cornell’s life and view the prepared slide show on Magnum’s Blog, click here.

Read the New York Times remembrance written by Philip Gefter here

Read the LA Times obituary here

Read the International Herald Tribune obituary here

To read the PDN Obituary, click here.

Read and listen to the remembrance of NPR’s All Things Considered here

When print dealer Peter Fetterman produced a catalogue of Capa’s work in 2001, it featured this piece written by the late Richard Whelan, biographer of Cornell’s older brother Robert Capa:

“During the course of his life, Cornell Capa has had three major and interrelated careers: (1) as a photographer who worked extensively for Life magazine and who has long been a member of the influential Magnum agency; (2) as the champion and editor of his brother Robert Capa¼s work; and (3) as the founder and director of the International Center of Photography in New York. After the opening of ICP in 1974, Cornell Capa had no time to pursue his own career as a photographer. Furthermore, his modesty and ethics prevented him from using his position to promote the photographs that he had made during nearly thirty years with Life and Magnum. Thus Cornell Capa the photographer has been overshadowed- indeed, almost completely hidden- by Cornell Capa the founder of ICP and by Cornell Capa the brother of Robert. Cornell Capa coined the phrase “concerned photographer” to signify a photographer who is passionately dedicated to doing work that will contribute to the understanding or the well-being of humanity- work that focuses with compassion, with intelligence, with warmth and generosity of spirit upon the human condition. Cornell Capa is himself a deeply concerned photographer. To all his work he brings his love of people and his profound concern for the plight of humanity. Robert Capa never photographed war as a dispassionate observer but rather always as a partisan. He used his camera not merely to make an accurate record but also to help the side in whose cause he believed. Cornell Capa has done the same as a photographer of peace. He has photographed, as a partisan fighting the cause of humanity, what he loves and what he hates. He often quotes the words of reformer-photographer Lewis W. Hine: “There were two things that I wanted to do. I wanted to show the things that needed to be corrected. And I wanted to show the things that needed to be appreciated.” That is precisely what Cornell has dedicated his life to doing. As a teenager, Cornell wanted to become a doctor so that he could help humanity. Instead, he became a humanitarian photographer. It is very revealing that he became deeply involved in photographing the work of missionaries in Central and South America, for he himself is a kind of missionary, dedicated to advancing the cause of human decency through the power of photographic images to changed the ways in which people look at their world. Cornell Capa is above all else a photographer of people. No landscape or citiscape interests him unless it is populated. Robert Capa once remarked that the best advice he could give to other photographers was: “Like people and let them know it.” That phrase could easily serve as the motto for the entire professional career of Cornell Capa. Without any doubt the quality that characterizes and unites all of Cornell¼s work is his extraordinary rapport with the people he photographs. Like his brother, Cornell puts his subjects at ease with his friendship, his sensitivity, his sympathy, and his enthusiasm. Cornell never exploits his subjects to make a sensationalistic picture; to him a good picture is one that does justice to its subject. Similarly with John F. Kennedy, Cornell was an enthusiastic supporter. After having covered Kennedy’s campaign, he was so moved by the new president’s inaugural address that he conceived- and was able to put into immediate execution- a project for nine Magnum photographers to cover every aspect of the administration’s first 100 days. Cornell himself covered the White House, where he was warmly accepted by Kennedy and his wife. (Indeed, Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis became an important early supporter of ICP.) In a completely different area of experience, Cornell’s photo-essay about an elderly woman living with her son and daughter-in-law in Philadelphia certainly derived much of its effectiveness from Cornell’s great sympathy with the old lady. His own beloved but demanding mother had lived for many years with him and his wife, Edie, and he was thus well aware of the difficulties on both sides of such a situation. When Camera magazine asked Cornell in 1963 to make a selection of his own photographs for publication, he replied, “Single photographs are not what I do best. My most effective work is groups of photographs which hand together and tell stories. My pictures are the words which make up sentences which in turn form the story… I hope that as often as possible my pictures may have feeling, composition, and sometimes beauty- but my preoccupation is with the story and not with attaining a fine-art level in the individual pictures.” Nevertheless, although Cornell nearly always set out to shoot groups of pictures that would cohere to form a factual and revealing narrative, the fact remains that within most of his photo-essays certain pictures stand out so strongly- because of the feelings that they capture, because of the effectiveness of their composition, and because of the beauty of the impact of the subject as seen and recorded on film by the photographer- that they sum up the entire story and even transcend it. They remain imbued with the very essence of the specific situation or person that they portray, and yet they simultaneously resonate with universal human experience. In other words, they are art. Even in isolation they speak whole sentences, and indeed whole volumes. They stand very solidly on their own and engrave themselves permanently upon the memory. © Richard Whelan, 2001. All rights reserved. From to the book, Cornell Capa, published by The Peter Fetterman Gallery, September 1st, 2001″

The Press Release from ICP is downloadable from this page as a pdf and informs us of the following:

“Buriel is private. A memorial service will be held on September 10th at 10 a.m. at The Times Center at 242 West 41st Street in Manhattan. Contributions in the memor of Cornell Capa may be made to the Cornell Capa Legacy Project, International Center for Photography, 1114 Avenue of the Americas, New York NY 10036; or by calling Chuck Ferrero at 212-857-0036.”

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Curator Leads Gallery Walk, Print Center in Philadelphia 5/31

At the Print Center:  82nd Annual International Competition: Photography

Juried by JOEL SMITH, Curator of Photography, Princeton University Art Museum

Saturday, May 31st, Opening Reception 3-5; CURATOR’S TALK at 3:30 p.m.

Exhibiting Artists

Paul Adams
Alberto Aguilar
Sarah Bones
Devorah Bowen
Ellie Brown
Allen Bryan
Marshall Clarke
Phyllis Crowley
Carol Dragon
Daniel Farnum
Jimmy Fike
Timothy Fitzgerald
Irene Imfeld
Sean Justice
Stephanie Kirk
Susan Lakin
Michael Matsil
Mike Mergen

Thomas Porett
Robert L. Pratto
Jack Ramsdale
Paul Rider
Nadine Rovner
Libby Rowe
Constance Schroder
Robert Shults
Harris J. Sklar
Chris Smiar
Amy Stein
Stephen Strom
Jennifer Tauber
Daniel Traub
David Underwood
Matthew D. White
Petronella Ytsma
Bahar Yurukoglu

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LOOK 3: Festival of the Photography, Charlottesville on June 12-14

If you haven’t heard of LOOK 3 happening in Charlottesville Virginia in mid-June, you will.

From the website:

“3 days of peace, love and photography. A festival for those that love the still image, celebrating the careers of legendary artists, emerging talent, and the best work from the past year.”

If you haven’t attended, you will. Lectures, panel discussions, conversations, exhibitions, workshops and more. This event has evolved from a gathering in National Geographic photographer Michael “Nick” Nichol’s backyard to a major event and memorable experience.

Check it out here – and don’t wait too long to register, secure housing and make plans to BE THERE.

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Sander and Becher Exhibitions at the Getty Museum in Los Angeles

If you are in the vicinity of the Getty Museum between now and September 14th, don’t miss these two shows:

August Sander: People of the Twentieth Century

“See August Sander’s riveting portrait of the German people in the early 20th century. Come eye to eye with rural farmers and city aristocrats, businessmen and tradesmen, artists and inventors in this exhibition that presents one of the most moving groups of photographic portraits ever made.”

(see schedule of related programming here)

and

Bernd and Hilla Becher: Basic Forms

“Architectural forms—winding towers, framework houses, blast furnaces, water towers—reveal unexpected beauty in these photographs by Bernd and Hilla Becher. Many of the Bechers’ early images were taken in the Siegen district, where August Sander’s subjects had lived or worked half a century before.”

(see schedule of related programming here)

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