Archive for MUST HEAR

Thursday 17th, 5:30 pm at the CCP in Tucson: Guest Curator Kate Palmer Albers on “Locating Landscape” exhibition; Joe Deal’s WEST AND WEST also on view through August 1

From the Center for Creative Photography website:

“Gallery Walk
Thursday, June 17, 5:30 p.m.

Join exhibition curator, Dr. Kate Palmer Albers, for a walking discussion of Locating Landscape: New Strategies, New Technologies on Thursday, June 17th, at 5:30 p.m.   The exhibition continues through August 1st.

Inspired by the recent revival of the influential New Topographics exhibition from 1975, Locating Landscape: New Strategies, New Technologies traces the effect of newly available technologies such as GPS and Google mapping on today’s landscape photography.”   Guest-curated by University of Arizona photography historian Kate Palmer Albers, this exhibition includes work by Christiana Caro, Andrew Freeman, Frank Gohlke, Margo Ann Kelley, Mark Klett, Paho Mann, Adam Thorman and Byron Wolfe.”


Also continuing through August 1st:

West and West: Joe Deal

Drawing on the remarkable history of 19th-century survey photography of the Great Plains, West and West was also inspired by the landscapes Joe Deal saw as a child while driving west from his home in Topeka, Kansas, to visit relatives in Great Bend. Deal presents the Western landscape in a consistent format, dividing each scene with a horizon line and using the square-format negative. His depiction presents an endlessly fascinating and changing expanse as grasslands and sky unfold in equal share. The 21 images on view capture the full drama of the Great Plains, spanning the area between the Mississippi River and the Rocky Mountains, and from the Canadian provinces to the Mexican border.

The Center for American Places has published a book in conjunction with this show, WEST and WEST: Reimagining the Great Plains (112 pages, 51 duotones, 3 maps  10×11, October 2009).

From the University of Chicago Press’ website:

The Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 officially opened the Great Plains to westward settlement, and the public survey of 1855 by Charles A. Manners and Joseph Ledlie along the Sixth Principal Meridian established the grid by which the uncharted expanse of the Great Plains was brought into scale. The mechanical act performed by land surveyors is believed by photographer Joe Deal to be powerfully similar to the artistic act of making a photograph.To Deal, both acts are about establishing a frame around a vast scene that suggests no definite boundaries of its own.  Thus, when approaching his own photographs of the Great Plains, Deal viewed his photography as a form of reenactment, a method of understanding how it felt to contain the Great Plains in smaller, more measurable units.

In West and West, Deal, who was born and raised in Kansas, revisited the Kansas-Nebraska territory and applied his photographic understanding of the landscape grid and horizon line to illuminate the sense of infinite space that transcends the reality of the survey. As Deal writes in his concluding essay: “If the square, as employed in the surveys of public lands, could function like a telescope, framing smaller and smaller sections of the plains down to a transect, it can also be used as a window, equilaterally divided by the horizon, that begins with a finite section of the earth and sky and restores them in the imagination to the vastness that now exists as an idea: the landscape that is contained within the perfect symmetry of the square implies infinity.”

The stunning photographs in West and West present the Great Plains from a rare perspective. From this vantage point, Deal is able to distill and contemplate its expanse.”   You can read the press release here.

Author Biography

Joe Deal was born in 1947 in Topeka, Kansas. He has served as the provost of the Rhode Island School of Design. Deal has been awarded a John Simon Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship and two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships and his work is included in numerous museums, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; the J. Paul Getty Trust, Los Angeles; and the International Museum of Photography at George Eastman House, Rochester.
Deal is represented by the Robert Mann Gallery in NYC, which in the winter of 2004 hosted the exhibition JOE DEAL: THE FAULT ZONE & OTHER WORK 1976 – 1986.  You can view all the work from the exhibition here, and read the complete press release here.

This exhibition marks the Center’s first opportunity to display a monographic Joe Deal show since acquiring his archive in 2009.


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June 12: An evening with David Hillard 8pm at CPW

From The Center for Photography Woodstock website:

DAVID HILLIARD creates multi-paneled color photographs, often based on his life or the lives of people around him. His panoramas allow the artist to direct the viewer’s gaze across the image surface letting narrative and time unfold. David received his BFA from the Massachusetts College of Art in 1992 and his MFA from Yale University in 1994. He worked for many years as an assistant professor at Yale University where he alsos directed the undergraduate photography department. Additionally, he has taught at Harvard University, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and was the director of the photography department at Cranbrook Art Academy in Michigan during the 2007/2008 academic year. Currently, he is an assistant professor at the Massachusetts College of Art & Design. Hilliard exhibits his photographs both nationally and internationally and has won numerous awards including a Fulbright Fellowship and a Guggenheim Fellowship. He is represented by Carroll and Sons Gallery in Boston, Yancey Richardson Gallery in New York, Jackson Fine Art in Atlanta and the Mark Moore Gallery in Santa Monica.  In 2005 a collection of his photographs was published in a monograph by Aperture. For more information please visit www.davidhilliard.com

Public Lecture will take place on June 12th at 8 pm at the Center for Photography at Woodstock.

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June 12: Project 5 Special Reception and Fundraiser JD Gallery Venice

From a P5 mailer:

“Special Reception and Fundraiser for Project 5!

When: Saturday, June 12th, 2010 7-10p.m.

Where: The Julia Dean Gallery at 801 Ocean Front Walk, Venice CA 90291

Project 5 spans five years, over which five photography auctions will be held to fund five socially concerned pohtographic projects, each documented by a team of talented photojournalists.

The first (silent) auction was held at the Stephen Cohen Gallery on Feb. 20, 2010. On the walls hung 108 photographs reflecting 108 talented photographers. It was a wonderful night and we raised enough money to conclude the child labor project (the first of five in Project 5).  At the end of the night, there were 36 outstanding photographs remaining. These 36 prints will be hanging at our special reception. ALL FRAMED PRINTS WILL BE $300 OR LESS! (You can take your print home that night.) Our goal is to raise money toward year 2 of Project 5. For more information: http://Photo4Change.org

-June 12th is also World Day Agaist Child Labor. Ending child labor is the topic of P5’s first documentary project.

- There will be an additional reception and exhibit opening in our second gallery, featuring work by participants on the Buenos Aires/Uruguay travel workshop.”

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June 4th: Michael Kenna and Julie Anand Lecture at SFAI

From the PhotoAlliance website:

“Date:

June 4, 2010

Time:
7:30 pm
Location:
San Francisco Art Institute Lecture Hall 800 Chestnut Street San Francisco, Ca (at Jones Street)
Ticket Information:
$10.00 general admission $5.00 students with ID— TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR
Over the past 30 years Michael Kenna has forged a well-earned reputation as one of the foremost landscape photographers of his generation, creating ethereal and enigmatic interpretations of man made environments within the natural landscape.
Julie Anand works in collaboration with Damon Sauer.

Julie Anand is currently Assistant Professor of Photography at Arizona State University. Damon Sauer teaches as Adjunct Faculty at Glendale Community College in Glendale AZ and recently served as a Visiting Assistant Professor of Photography at Herron School of Art and Design, IUPUI in Indianapolis. Both artists investigate ideas through a diversity of photographic media and technologies. Anand and Sauer received their MFA degrees in photography from the University of New Mexico and began collaborating with one another in 2005.”

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Through the Lens: Creating Santa Fe full length interviews available to watch!

From a Through the Lens e-blast:

“Links to the full-length interviews from Through the Lens are posted individually to each web-length interview on the following website:

http://www.palaceofthegovernors.org/lens/videos.php

Through the Lens: Creating Santa Fe is a visual history of Santa Fe, New Mexico — as it celebrates its 400th anniversary as the oldest capital city in North America. These images, selected from the collection of the Photo Archives at the Palace of the Governors and through studio visits with contemporary photographers, illuminate the multiple meanings of place.

Through the Lens: Creating Santa Fe is a visual record of transformation. The exhibition is divided into three broad and overlapping themes: Place, Identity, and History. While some of the photographs provide a broad perspective on cultural and social transformation, the exhibition also contains photographs that reveal a more intimate side of the city’s history.”

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May 20th: David Maisel Lecture at The Annenberg Space for Photography in LA

From the Annenberg Space for Photography website:

“David Maisel:
“Black Maps”
Registration for this event will go live Wednesday, May 12, 12pm PT and Thursday, May 13, 9:30am PT.

David MaiselFor more than twenty years, David Maisel has been making aerial photographs of sites of environmental impact. This extended series, called Black Maps, shows the undoing of the natural world by wide-scaled human intervention in the landscape. His images of zones where the natural order has been eradicated are both spectacular and horrifying. Although Maisel’s photographs evidence the devastation of these locations, they also transcribe interior, psychic landscapes—for, as otherworldly and surreal as these images appear, they depict shattered realities of our own making. The forms of environmental disquiet and degradation function on a metaphorical level, and the aerial perspective enables one to experience the landscape like a vast map of its undoing. Black Maps has unfolded in chapters, focusing on such subjects as strip-mines, clear-cuts, leaching fields, tailings ponds, and firestorms. The Lake Project (2001-2003) is comprised of images made in the vicinity of Owens Lake in California, which was drained and depleted to bring water to the desert city of Los Angeles, and which became an enormous environmental disaster in this process. Terminal Mirage (2003-2005) uses aerial images made at the site of the Great Salt Lake as a means to explore both abstraction and, as the curator Anne Tucker has written about this series, “the disturbingly engaging duality between beauty and repulsion.”

David Maisel was born in New York City in 1961. He received his BA from Princeton University and his MFA from California College of the Arts, in addition to study at the Graduate School of Design at Harvard University. He was a 2007 Visiting Scholar at the Getty Research Institute, and a 2008 Artist in Residence at the Headlands Center for the Arts. Maisel is represented in the permanent collections of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, the Brooklyn Museum of Art, and others. His monograph The Lake Project (Nazraeli Press, 2004), was selected as one of the Top 25 Photography Books of 2004 by the critic Vince Aletti. His second monograph, Oblivion (Nazraeli Press, 2006), depicts tonally-reversed black and white aerial views of Los Angeles.”

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May 15th: Panel Discussion for Wynn Bullock: A Visionary Photographer Revisited at CPA

From the Center for Photographic Art website:

“Wynn Bullock: Color Light Abstractions
National Premiere of the Traveling Exhibit

May 15 through June 26, 2010
Opening Reception: May 15, 2010 4-6 pm

Wynn Bullock
Color Light Abstraction 1071, 1960
©1960/2010 Bullock Family Photography LLC. All Rights Reserved.

Panel Discussion: Wynn Bullock: A Visionary Photographer Revisited
Saturday, May 15, 2-4 pm, Carpenter Hall, Sunset Center

Moderated by Curator Michael Spencer with A. D. Coleman, Photographic Historian, New York; Richard Gadd, Executive Director of The Weston Gallery, Carmel; Chris Johnson, Professor of Photography, California College of the Arts; Dr. Britt Salvesen, Head of Photography at Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and Dr. Karen Sinsheimer, Curator of Photography at Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

Mid-twentieth century master photographer, Wynn Bullock, is best known for his evocative black and white images. Early in the 1960’s, Bullock began creating color photographs of light. Hampered by the limitations of color printing at that time, he was unable to make stable, exhibit-quality prints of these abstract images before his death. This is the first solo exhibit of the high-quality archival prints that have been produced from Bullock’s original slides, using the superior color reproduction processes available today.

A new 96-page monograph is being released to accompany the exhibition containing full page color reproductions of the exhibit prints. Edited by Bullock’s daughter Barbara Bullock-Wilson, designed by Bert Ihlenfeld, and printed by Dual Graphics, it is the first major publication devoted to Bullock’s abstract color imagery. Barbara Bullock-Wilson will be available to inscribe the catalogue for collectors at the opening reception.”

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